American Classics
Museum Masterworks sculptures are hand-cast and hand-finished in crushed stone resin. Centuries-old casting techniques still apply. Artisans apply the patina in a labor-intensive process that requires several layers and specialized shading. The result is a durable statue that stands up to the ravages of time.
IX XI

IX XI

“IX XI” sculpture was created to memorialize the day that forever changed our lives. Of her piece, artist Ultra Violet said, "Roman numerals embed in our minds the memory of that date. Magenta is the color of mourning for all those whose lives were lost that day. It is my desire that we work together to create a peaceful world. It has been years since the event. My heart has mended: To be grateful for what remains. To look at tomorrow with the wonder and eyes of a child. To love unconditionally. To connect truth and beauty. To cherish the goodwill of mankind everywhere."

Wedding Rings

Wedding Rings

Peter Lipman-Wulf was born in 1905 in Germany, a Christian born to a family with Jewish heritage. He was chosen as the State Academy of Fine Arts in Berlin’s Master Stone Carver, but was forced to leave his position and flee to France after Hitler came to power. In 1937, he was awarded the gold medal at the Exposition Mondiale in Paris, but in 1939-1940, he was interned with many other artists and intellectuals. In 1942, he was able to escape to Switzerland with his Swiss wife and daughter. He emigrated to the United States in 1947, where he made his home in New York City until relocating to Long Island, in the mid-1970s. He died on September 26, 1993, in Europe, while attending several openings of his exhibits in France. The sculpture Wedding Rings was first sculpted from Brazilian rosewood in 1953. It was exhibited under the name Embrace, then as Rings. Eventually, Lipman-Wulf’s then-wife, Muriel, had the idea to call it Wedding Rings, since the artist’s poverty had prevented the couple from buying wedding rings at the time. Thus renamed and exhibited in 1958, the piece received much attention. Shortly thereafter, a photo of the statue appeared in a Sunday New York Times Magazine article in the wedding section, and the piece instantly became much sought-after. The timeless sculpture’s popularity has been ever-growing since.

297VMB 8"

298VMB 16.25"

299VMB 12.25"

Ex Nihilo

Ex Nihilo

The majestic west front of Washington National Cathedral is classically Gothic in form, honoring centuries of tradition in sacred architecture. The 13-foot tall tympanum over the central portal, a masterpiece entitled Ex Nihilo, dominates the suite of sculptures. Ex Nihilo's eight figures, their eyes not yet opened to the new life that awaits them, are captured in what sculptor Frederick Hart described as a "state of rebirth and reaffirmation of all the possibilities of being human." This reproduction is available exclusively through the Washington National Cathedral.

139MB 10"

Creating Memories

Creating Memories

This beautifully flowing sculpture, created by Alice Heath, represents the eternal bonds of love between mother and child. The flowing lines and graceful curves express playfullness and abiding joy.

170BG 18"

Mother and Child

Mother and Child

Although an expert in many mediums, Walter A. Hannula favors direct carving in stone. His forms are strongly abstract in style but do not deny the natural shapes from which they evolve, nor the emotions which motivated them. His radical concentration on the essence of a concept never winds up with a dehumanized construction. "Mother and Child" was carved in sandstone in 1963. The artist considers this as the definitive execution after two preliminary versions which were widely exhibited and acclaimed.

328W 8.5"

Cat's Meow

Cat's Meow

The Cat's Meow reflects the attitude of all the sassy cats we have ever met. The simple domestic cat is one of the most popular and whimsical creatures - known for its attitudes and antics. The Cat's Meow is a unique collector's item that will be treasured for years to come.

600V 8"

602V 21"

The War Horse

The War Horse

Since its first arrival to the Virginia Historical Society in 1997, The War Horse has been a Richmond landmark. Now standing on Richmond’s Boulevard, The War Horse was built in memorial to the 1.5 million horses and mules that died during the Civil War. The War Horse was designed by Tessa Pullan and was later given to the Virginia Historical Society by Paul Mellon. Son of industrialist Andrew Mellon, Paul Mellon was a great patron of the arts and philanthropist who gave much of his immense fortune to cultural and educational institutions. This handsome hand-cast and hand-finished reproduction in stone crushed resin is available exclusively through the Virginia Historical Society.

619B 10"

Miss Wetmore's Teahouse Rabbits

Miss Wetmore's Teahouse Rabbits

Adapted from two fanciful rabbits, cast from a pair of 1935 stone originals, by American sculptor Charles Rudy. They adorn the gateposts and bring character to Miss Wetmore's restored teahouse on the grounds of Chateau-sur-Mer, the former Wetmore summer residence, in Newport, Rhode Island.

632L (left) 22.25"

632R (right) 22.25"

New York Public Library Lion Bookends

New York Public Library Lion Bookends

Exact scale models of the heroic-size lions in front of the New York Public Library, created under the supervision of the Library.

776AS 6.75"

New York Public Library Lion Paperweight

New York Public Library Lion Paperweight

A beautifully detailed reproduction of one of the lions that proudly stand guard at the steps of The New York Public Library. This handsome marble-finish paperweight measures 4 inches (tall to the head) and will be a favorite gift among New Yorkers and Library lovers everywhere for the memories it evokes of both the Library and New York City.

777AS 4"